Jul 29

Web.com to Host Small Business Summit, Offers Free Online Marketing Seminar to …

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., July 29, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Web.com (Nasdaq:WWWW), a leading provider of Internet services and online marketing solutions for small businesses, will host a free Web.com Small Business Summit designed to help small business owners in the northeastern Ohio learn how to successfully increase their business’ visibility and better market themselves online. The Web.com Small Business Summit will take place on Wednesday, August 5, from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. Through Web.com’s agreement, with the PGA TOUR and as umbrella sponsor of the Web.com Tour, Web.com developed the Small Business Summit as a benefit to small business owners in communities across the country.

“Through the creativity and risk-taking of local entrepreneurs and small businesses northeast Ohio, our area continues to generate significant job growth and economic development,” said Don Padgett, tournament director for the World Golf Championships–Bridgestone Invitational. “To stay competitive in today’s marketplace, it is important for small business owners to build an online presence and learn the ins and outs of what it takes to be successful online. With the help of our corporate partner, Web.com, we are pleased to help local small business owners continue to prosper and grow while also having the chance to enjoy the World Golf Championships–Bridgestone Invitational experience.”

Justin Leedy, director of marketing at Web.com, will lead the discussion at the Web.com Small Business Summit, and will share information and tools that small business owners can use to improve their cash flow and business performance; increase their online visibility; and optimize their online marketing efforts.

Topics and content at the Web.com Small Business Summit focus on ways small business owners can achieve a successful Internet presence, including the elements of a great website, how to determine if their website is working for them, increasing traffic to their website and business, mobile marketing and decoding how to efficiently market their business on Google, Facebook and Twitter.

“As part of our commitment to give back to the communities we serve, we are pleased to offer this event which is focused on helping small business owners improve their business model,” said Leedy. “Every day, Web.com helps millions of business owners address the challenges of building and maintaining an effective online presence that allows their businesses to grow. We expect a lively dialogue covering a range of key, timely topics that small business owners face when tackling this increasingly important digital opportunity.”

Event Details:

  • Where: Firestone Country Club, 452 East Warner Road, Akron, OH
  • When: Wednesday, August 5; registration, continental breakfast and networking 9:00 a.m.; presentation will start promptly at 10:00 a.m. and will conclude by 12:00 p.m.
  • Cost: Attendance is free, but advanced registration is requested at smallbusinesssummit.web.com
  • Social media: Twitter: @webdotcom / Facebook: Web.com / Hashtag: #SmallBizSummit
  • All attendees will receive a complimentary ticket to the World Golf Championships – Bridgestone Invitational Golf Tournament

For the schedule of all 2015 Web.com Small Business Summits or for more information about this Web.com Small Business Summit, go to the Web.com Small Business Summit website, or contact smallbusinesssummit@web.com, or call 800-862-8718.

Attention Editors/News Directors: Click here to view a brief video on what it’s like to attend a Web.com Small Business Summit event.

About Web.com

Web.com Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:WWWW) provides a full range of Internet services to small businesses to help them compete and succeed online. Web.com is owner of several global domain registrars and further meets the needs of small businesses anywhere along their lifecycle with affordable, subscription-based solutions including website design and management, search engine optimization, online marketing campaigns, local sales leads, social media, mobile products, eCommerce solutions and call center services. To get more information, visit web.com; follow Web.com on Twitter @webdotcom or on Facebook at facebook.com/web.com. For additional online marketing resources and small business networking, please visit Web.com’s Small Business Summit.

About PGA TOUR

The PGA TOUR is the world’s premier membership organization for touring professional golfers, co-sanctioning more than 130 tournaments on the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour, Web.com Tour, PGA TOUR Latinoamérica, PGA TOUR Canada and PGA TOUR China.

The PGA TOUR’s mission is to entertain and inspire its fans, deliver substantial value to its partners, create outlets for volunteers to give back, generate significant charitable and economic impact in the communities in which it plays, and provide financial opportunities for TOUR players.

Worldwide, PGA TOUR tournaments are broadcast to more than 1 billion households in 225 countries and territories in 32 languages. Virtually all tournaments are organized as non-profit organizations in order to maximize charitable giving. In 2013, tournaments across all Tours generated more than $134 million for local and national charitable organizations and in early 2014 the TOUR’s all-time charitable contributions surpassed $2 billion.

The PGA TOUR’s web site is PGATOUR.COM, the No. 1 site in golf, and the organization is headquartered in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. 

Note to Editors: Web.com is a registered trademark of Web.com Group, Inc.

Media Contact:
Ashley Clontz
Golin for Web.com
972-701-6974

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Jul 28

The Cross-Border Series Part 3: Landing An E-Commerce Strategy In Latin America

latin-american-flags-ss-1920

“Latin America” is a term that identifies the countries throughout the Northern, Central, Southern and Caribbean Americas where Romance languages are the primary tongue, which counts a combined population of about 600 million people. LatAm is also home to a regional economy of $6 trillion (World Bank figures for all countries) and an e-commerce industry that’s valued at $88.3 billion in 2015 and growing by 24.2% annually (eMarketer study).

When it comes to Latin America’s status among digital marketers, one major theme rings out: Latin American customers cannot be ignored by any business that is serious about international growth.

Part 3 of the cross-border series for search marketers provides several useful learnings to consider when establishing a Latin American strategy, from opportunities to challenges and beyond.

While Latin America encompasses more than 20 countries, one thing to know is that there is a sizable discrepancy between the two major leaders (Brazil and Mexico) and the rest of the pack.

According to eMarketer, Brazil and Mexico accounted for 36% and 20% of regional e-commerce sales, respectively. These regional titans are also poised to increase their dominance with continued infrastructure improvements, since both countries have large populations and economies but low internet penetration rates. Brazil is at 200 million people, a $2.25 trillion GDP and 54% internet penetration; Mexico is at 122 million people, a $1.26 trillion GDP and 44% internet penetration (per World Bank figures and an online database of internet penetration rates).

Argentina often takes third in marketing investments, given Argentina’s leading internet penetration rates, third-largest economy and fourth-largest population; however, be aware that doing business as a foreign company in Argentina is complicated due to governmental regulations. Colombia and Chile are also countries that rank in the top consideration set for marketers, given their regionally high internet penetration rates and economic activity.

Digital Ad Spending in Latin America, by Country, 2012-2018

Source: eMarketer

Key Points To Keep In Mind When Marketing To Latin American Customers

Shopping Sprees. Digital marketers will be glad to know that Latin American consumers are highly engaged in shopping, spending a good portion of their disposable income on retail and e-commerce. Data from Worldpay’s 2012 Global Online Shopper Report supports the trend of Latin America’s shopping habits, with Brazilian shoppers spending 27% of their disposable income on shopping on the internet, and Mexicans and Argentines each shelling out 21%; for context, the study pegs the global average (and the United States) at 23%.

Additionally, some consumers are also used to paying more for products, with a pair of jeans in Brazil costing 35% more than they do in the US and a pair of Nike running shoes costing more than 24% over the US cost, per Numbeo statistics. While this does spell opportunity for e-commerce marketers who are ready to invest in a regional campaign, there are some challenges to consider before tapping into these shopping habits.

Mobile Is Massive. One of the most important facts to consider when developing a strategy is that Latin Americans overwhelmingly use mobile devices in their daily lives, and especially to connect to the internet. Maren Lau, CMO at Internet Media Services, commented on LatAm’s mobile trend in a 2015 eMarketer interview: “Latin America is a mobile-first region. As digital consumers grow, they’re starting to use mobile and may not even have a computer.”

One eMarketer study, “Mobile Rivals PCs for Brazil’s Internet Audience,” found that in 2013 there were 142.7 million mobile users in the country and predicted that by 2017, nearly all (98%) of Brazil’s internet users will do so from their mobile phones. Another eMarketer study on Mexican internet trends indicated that 81.4% of Mexican internet users will connect from their mobile phones in 2015. In order to succeed in Latin America, digital marketers must optimize for mobile apps, websites and conversion funnels.

Payment Puzzles Are Plenty. While many Latin American customers use credit and debit cards for purchases, most do not use international cards; according to Allpago, 69% of Brazilians use credit cards for online purchases, yet 70% came from internationally restrictive national cards. A large number of Latin Americans prefer instead to use alternative payment methods or cash, requiring businesses who want to sell to Latin American customers to partner with local payment processors or pay-on-delivery companies.

Popular alternative payment methods include Boleto Bancário in Brazil, PayPal and cash on delivery in Mexico, and other payment vendors such as DineroMail and Astropay.

An additional payment-related consideration highlighted in the Worldpay study is that Latin American customers consistently indicated that fears of fraud and identity theft were chief concerns, making alleviating customer concerns of safety while shopping online an important task for businesses.

Per the same Worldpay study, customers were also concerned with finding a good deal and not being surprised by additional charges or taxes. A summary of the Worldpay study is available from the company’s CEO, Shane Happach, on the Huffington Post’s blog.

Other Operational Obstacles. While Latin American countries are growing in terms of importance, doing business in Latin America is still a difficult task. Businesses looking to expand to Latin America face high import taxes and currency exchanges that make American goods more expensive, as well as an underdeveloped shipping infrastructure that makes delivering products a big logistical challenge. Additionally, with the exception of Argentina, Latin American countries have very low English language skills, requiring Portuguese and Spanish translation support for websites, keywords and ads.

Speaking of language, marketers would do well to study the differences in geographic dialect across languages, such as spelling of the word “ticket.” Latam at Microsoft’s Mariano Medina Walker provides additional context:

As Oscar Wilde once said in reference to England and America, in Spanish Latin America we are also “separated by a common language.” For example, for “airline ticket” you say “boleto” in Mexico, “tiquete” in Colombia, and “pasaje” in Argentina. Taking this into consideration will help your Ad look familiar to the Latin American consumer.

Differences in dialect can also be found within the same country, explains Karinne Lima, Bing ads account coordinator at Microsoft:

While certain Brazilian states would look for “sapatos,” others would most likely search for “calçados” instead. Another example is the debate between “bolacha” in São Paulo versus “biscoito” in Rio.

So Who’s Winning?

Many companies have set their sights on Latin American customers. Amazon is a prime example, having called Mexico “its biggest international launch ever” after launching a Mexican online storefront.

There’s Rocket Internet’s new fashion startup, Vaniday, which is seeking success in Brazil. Why? Probably because Brazil is, according to McKinsey, “the third-largest beauty and personal-care market in the world, after Japan and the US.”

Alibaba’s Aliexpress.com sub-brand has also established a weighty presence in Brazil, per an Internet Retailer report, becoming the country’s third-largest e-commerce website, with 110 million monthly visitors. The report also illuminates how Aliexpress has adapted to overcome regional obstacles by partnering with Correios (the official Brazilian postal service) and local payment processors.

Opportunities in the region also include consumers within the Caribbean countries: For example, a recent Fast Company article highlights how Airbnb sprang into action to capitalize and drive more booking volume in the wake of improving relations between the US and Cuba.

Additional Comments

While Latin America does present challenges for businesses looking to set up shop, the fact is that the region can no longer be ignored by marketers who are serious about international growth. With continuing improvements to governmental regulations, infrastructure, financial access, mobile adoption, internet penetration, and even education, the region holds a positive outlook.

Additionally, where there are challenges, there are bound to be solutions. Near Shore Americas and Pulso Social cite Axado and Loggi, two startups that have risen to the challenge of helping companies overcome challenges in delivery and logistics.

A final point for marketers to consider is that Latin America is one of the largest external influences on the United States, meaning that understanding Latin American customers should be a top priority for American businesses that wish to stay relevant in their own backyard.

For supporting detail, consider Mexico’s official immigration numbers, which top the list with near double the next highest country (135,028, compared to China’s 71,798). Consider also that, per a 2011 Pew Research study, 38 million people in the US speak Spanish as the primary language at home, more than 1,300% the next highest language of Chinese, tallied at 2.8 million.

Us census spanish speakers

Indeed, many marketers have already reacted to this trend of growing Latin American influence on the United States. A 2015 press release by the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies revealed that the top 500 US advertisers boosted their Hispanic ad investment from $4.3 billion/5.5% total ad spend in 2010 to $7.1 billion/8.4% total ad spend in 2014 (+63% absolute dollar growth and +57% of ad spend relative total spend).

An Advanced Bing Ads Intelligence Tactic: Estimated Ads Per Search

When setting up Latin America search campaigns, be sure to review these items:

  1. Optimize for your mobile app, website and conversion funnel.
  2. Localize and translate for the market you’re entering (e.g., translate into Portuguese for Brazil and Spanish for other countries, use the appropriate currency, optimize prices by market, etc.).
  3. Perform in-market keyword research.
  4. Break out your campaigns by country for better control and reporting.

To take keyword research a step further, you can use the Bing Ads Intelligence tool for Microsoft Excel to calculate an estimated ads per search metric when setting up a campaign in any new market. What this estimation metric uncovers is where demand (searches) is highest and competition (impressions) is lowest; you can find these data points by using the traffic and exact match, keyword performance report in the Bing Ads Intelligence tool. Competing with fewer ads for a click can both improve your click-through rate (CTR) and reduce your effective cost per click (CPC), which means you can acquire more customers at a lower effective cost per acquisition.

Going a level deeper, you can combine this competitive metric with market CPC, impression and CTR data and also add your own data, such as profit margins, to zero in on your highest potential products, forecast budget, and predict ROAS, all without spending a dime. Here is an example of a calculated ads per search (APS) analysis for the month of June for all device types. We can draw a few conclusions from this particular report.

  1. For the majority of Latin American countries here, searches for the English keyword “shoes” have a lower APS than the native language variant. In fact, Mexico doesn’t seem to have any ads, and in Brazil, searches for “shoes” have a 40% lower APS.
  2. Brazil, as expected, has the highest APS; however, Mexico has an APS near 1 and comparatively very strong demand.
  3. On average, fewer than one in three Argentine searches for “zapatos” currently show ads.

Assuming the conversion rates are similar, these are some profitable discoveries!

bing intelligence analysis ads per search

I want to conclude by thanking the following Latin American experts who contributed advice to this article: Tavane Gurdos, Mariano Medino Walker and Karinne Lima.

Stay tuned for the fourth and last installment of the cross-border series, which will cover the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region; as always, please feel free to share and comment if you have additional context, tips or lessons learned for marketing to Latin American customers.

Thanks for reading, boa otimização and feliz optimización!


Some opinions expressed in this article may be those of a guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.


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Jul 27

Marketing Strategy – The Hidden Power of IoT Data Can Help You Topple Your …

The massive amount of data being collected by software, hardware, and services is reaching unprecedented levels. As new innovations and products come to market each day, more companies—both industry giants and young startups—are vying for new ways to strike the Internet of Things (IoT) market-share gold.

Every technology that plays in the IoT is collecting data of some type. Behavioral and financial information, even personal preferences, can be aggregated to improve a consumer’s experience. Though that may seem more advantageous to the industry giants (given the amount of data they possess), the smaller, nimble players can use this to their benefit.

Small players can employ this slice of data intelligently within their specific context—multiplying the effectiveness of any data they gather. Harnessing this data quickly and relevantly will be necessary to differentiate across the ecosystem, and doing so will help to capture unique user information and industry benchmarks to gain a competitive edge.

Opportunities for Smaller Players

The potential opportunity for the smaller players is huge. Industry leaders, such as ARM, Google, IBM, and Apple, know this as they continually acquire younger, high-growth IoT startups—exemplified by Amazon’s recent acquisition of IoT startup 2lemetry—to take it off the board and collect its user data.


Google was one of the first to kick off a major IoT acquisition strategy with its acquisition of Nest Labs in 2014. Some may even argue that the smaller player’s long-term success in the IoT will be dependent on its ability to partner, coexist, and integrate with the bigger players while adding its own proprietary data layer.

It’s true that the IoT requires some level of cooperation—and will force old and new to play nice at times—but there’s still a unique opportunity for the smaller players. The rise of the Internet, and the data that drives it, was never about mass aggregation to constrain the market… It’s more the ability for new players to conceptualize their data and take advantage of the ongoing flow of information and services passing through the IoT.

As the Web continues to become more fragmented, the companies that get the most from their data is going to control their market. If you have access to an endless supply of user data, you can better understand your customers’ demands and easily offer multi-tiered offerings sold through devices, based on their product data and user preferences.

Put on Your Thinking Cap

The real opportunity now extends beyond just monetization.

Success becomes dependent on a company’s ability to think intelligently about the unique data and information captured and use it to carve a niche in the IoT ecosystem and become a threat to other players.

The future is not only about adding services on top of IoT devices, hardware, and the like; it’s dependent upon achieving monetization for these services on a higher level of granularity.

Consider how wearables like Nike+ have struggled to monetize, and how the long-term success of the Apple Watch is far from guaranteed. At the same time, companies like SmartThings and Nest have emerged, primed with their modern-day slingshots: Using their technology not just as a product to make sales but also a data-based medium in very specific contexts enables those companies to create personalized value for their customers.

For example, SmartThings has successfully created an intuitive platform conducive to achieving continuous user value and monetization. It provides one commerce hub that connects and integrates with several devices to create a “smart home,” acting as an aggregator of sorts. By harnessing the power of its user data, SmartThings is able to control, monitor, and customize its products and services based on specific user preferences.

Monetizing Across the Value Chain

As multiple players come to market, intermediaries will also re-emerge. Acting as the middle man, they’ll aggregate various new products and services on the buyer’s behalf to help monetize across the chain. These new value chains will comprise of three flows (goods/services, information, and incentives). By smartly managing those flows, they can create whole business models.

In partnering with various companies and using the data available, intermediaries can help buyers navigate the endless supply of services and enable businesses to reach a new pool of customers. Intermediaries also have the advantage of understanding local markets and buyer behaviors, and helping companies to motivate regional demand and dominate international markets.

* * *

The ability to employ the granularity of the data that IoT devices collect will be the driving force behind the ability of “Davids” to topple the “Goliaths.” Demand won’t just be for the giant companies but for the players that take a personalized approach to servicing their customers.

The companies with the ability to intelligently harness the data at their disposal will gain the competitive advantage.

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Jul 25

Image: 5 Ways To Master Tripwire Marketing – Business 2 Community

There is a popular term being used by marketers lately online called “tripwire marketing”. It is actually a concept that has been around for a long time (even before the internet). It involves segmenting your leads into interest groups, selling them into a low priced item and then up-selling those who buy into one of your main products or services.

What is Tripwire Marketing?

Tripwire MarketingOk, the term may sound a little sinister, but what it commonly means is turning a lead into a customer by making them a low-cost, relatively painless offer, then having the opportunity to upsell them once they are in your sales funnel.

This means that instead of asking someone to invest in your more expensive products or services first up you are able to repurpose or repackage parts of your more expensive items based on a certain more detailed solution in a way that delivers value and also “teases” what else is in store if someone chooses to buy more from you.

The idea is that once people have bought even an inexpensive item from you, they are more likely to purchase something else. Why? Veteran online marketer Frank Kern explains it well when he says that with a free offer, people will often be suspicious and wonder “what is the catch?”, whereas with a low-cost offer it tends to convert better because it helps to alleviate that suspicion.

Plus once someone goes from lead to buyer they now justify their purchase with you and are more emotionally connected to what you offer next. It also allows you to sell many of these inexpensive items across different topics to test what your market wants and then customise follow-up communications that are more targeted.

Recommended for YouWebcast: 5 Essentials Sales Managers Need to Know to Crush your Quarter

Whatever your preferred terminology…tripwire, splinter product, loss leader, front-end offer, or introductory offer… this idea has been around in one form or another for years and is still a very effective marketing technique. (Does anyone remember Columbia House’s old 11 “albums for a penny” mail order music club deal?)

original tripwire

Here are 5 Ways to Master Tripwire Marketing:

1. Start with a lead magnet (or as we like to say, party starter)

Before you can even offer the initial tripwire you need people to sign up for your email list. In order to do this you need to offer them something for free that leaves them thirsting for more and eager to take the next step with you. We give a list of ideas in our podcast about opt-in ideas that convert. (find out why the free eBook is pretty much dead for most markets!).

The important thing here is to offer something that your entire market will find valuable. It is the tripwires that will help you segment your list by using different topics and solutions of your larger products or services.

2. Create your tripwire

This is a low-ticket item that solves a very specific problem in your buyer’s life. This means that in order to create a successful tripwire, you need to get very specific about what kinds of problems your ideal customer may have.

Ideas include webinars, something physical that you mail out (such as a book – Brendon Burchard used this technique for The Charge), or even a personal consultation. Companies who offer a great deal (such as 5 children’s books for $3.95) to entice you into signing up with their subscription program are a great example of tripwires at work. Note that the idea is not necessarily to make any profit, in fact many tripwires are sold at a loss in order to bring in the customers.

Don’t just stop at one. Outline all of the different topics your list may be interested in and then start creating tripwires for each of these.

On our blog, for example, we ask how we can help…business automation, online marketing, social media strategy or website traffic tips. Why? We have found these are our most popular article types. Our main solutions are around building automated funnels and content marketing, but we generally help people first by addressing issues with their website or social media traffic.

A couple of our tripwires are a website checklist to help people see what they are leaving out on their website to grow their business and a Facebook ads training and cheatsheet to help people do better market research and quickly place an ad to the right people. Every business owner has issues online when it comes to growing their business. For some right now it will be traffic, for others it will be their website, and then there are people who aren’t good at follow up with their email list. We could have hundreds of online marketing stress points we could develop products for… all ultimately leading to either our DIY online marketing training or our done for you services.

Let’s use a personal trainer as an example next. If they were to only focus on weight loss they are potentially leaving 2/3 of their market from finding them…those that want to lose fat or gain muscle.

Tripwire-segmentation

A great lead magnet for them would be a 5 minute ab exercise that melts fat and builds definition. This would be something all 3 groups would be interested in. Once someone gets that, then 3 tripwires could be a smoothie recipe booklet for weight loss, 10 cardio moves to melt fat and a 3-step formula to double your mass in 3 months. All three would then upsell into the trainer’s signature 6 month program. This way he or she will know how to sell their program better by providing the benefits that only matter to the person who wants it. So suddenly instead of having one sales page they would have 3, and each tripwire purchase then sends the buyer to the sales page that is best for them.

Are you starting to see how powerful this can be, both by mastering your customer avatar but also only promoting things to your email list based on what they want.

3. Introduce your tripwire to prospects on your list

One way to do this is by sending out 2-3 emails offering your product for a limited amount of time. You can do this in a couple of ways: send your list straight to a sales page to get your tripwire or send them to a free piece of content that then sells the tripwire at the end.

The important thing to remember here is that not everyone on your list will click. This is what you want. You want to segment your list at this point into interest groups. This means your emails should be written in a way that clearly outlines the problem and the benefit of your tripwire or piece of content and how it can help. Get specific at this point.

Eventually you could have several different segments (or lists) based on the preferences shown by people on your list so that you can start sending certain types of emails to a certain segment.

Many email systems will allow you to segment your list. Some require using landing pages to get people to opt-in again to a new list and some allow you to create rules based on the links clicked in your emails to move people to different lists based on their preferences. No matter what email marketing program you use, you can still offer tripwires.

4. Introduce buyers to your core product

The intention of every tripwire is to introduce customers to a bigger offer and entice them to seek more from you. To that end, they should logically lead to a core product of yours that you wish to upsell to the customer. Many successful marketers offer a deal on the upsell while the customer is purchasing the tripwire – a “striking while the wallet is open” technique. Or, of course you could email out an offer on your core product separately, or use a combination of the two.

Trial periods are an example of a tripwire that is also a core product. For example, many different software or membership programs will allow you to have a 30 day trial period at very low cost. They tend to have a condition that you will start to be billed for full membership after the trial period unless you contact them and cancel. It gives customers the chance to check that the product is really for them and removes any doubt that the customer will opt in to the full subscription as they must opt out rather than opt in.

5. Rinse and Repeat

The chances are that there are many possible tripwire ideas that can lead to marketing your core product. You can run different tripwires concurrently or sequentially.

As you continue to set them up you are basically building a multi-faceted funnel or “web” of info highly targeted to solve a very specific problem that ultimately leads into what you really want to sell.

Make sure you test your tripwire ideas, including tweaking headlines and copy so that you get a definitive idea of what works and what your customers are looking for. You will find that there will be some more popular than others and that is OK. It all leads you one step closer to knowing what your leads want and helps you fine-tune what problems you should be solving instead of what you think your customers want.

Here’s a little tip: An easy way of developing a tripwire is to take your main offer and break off a piece of it and package it as an individual product. A website designer could sell a logo, a stylist could offer a wardrobe review, a massage therapist could offer an organic stress release lotion, a pool cleaning company could offer a DIY chlorine check, an accountant could offer a tax time checklist, a business lawyer could offer a contract template pack… these are all items they would use with you anyway should you “upgrade” to their main product or service.

For those interested in DIY learning in Autopilot Your Business we sometimes use some of our individual trainings from inside Digital Traffic Institute as a tripwire. It allows people to get a sneak peak into the type of training we do, and of course the upsell would be into the Institute.

Now it’s your turn to get creative. All you need is your email list, a product to sell and a few techy things set up behind the scenes to link and automate this and you could be promoting your first tripwire!

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Jul 23

Web.com Invites Minneapolis/St. Paul Small Businesses to Join Them at the Free …

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., July 23, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Web.com (Nasdaq:WWWW), a leading provider of Internet services and online marketing solutions for small businesses, will host a free Web.com Small Business Summit designed to help small business owners in the greater Minneapolis/St. Paul area learn how to successfully increase their business’ visibility and better market themselves online. The Web.com Small Business Summit will take place on Thursday, July 30, 2015, from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. at the TPC of the Twin Cities in Blaine, MN. Through Web.com’s agreement with the PGA TOUR and as umbrella sponsor of the Web.com Tour, Web.com developed the Small Business Summit as a benefit to small business owners in communities across the country.

“Across the greater Minneapolis/St. Paul area, small businesses and entrepreneurs are among the leading contributors to our growing job base and in helping our local economy continue to prosper,” said J. Hines, tournament director for the 3M Championship Presented by Post-it Products. “Small business owners have many competing demands on their time, foremost of which is running a business, and they don’t always have the knowledge to successfully market their business online. So with the help of our Champions Tour partner, Web.com, we are pleased to help local small business owners continue to prosper and grow while also having the chance to enjoy the 3M Championship Presented by Post-it Products experience.”

Justin Leedy, director of Marketing at Web.com, will lead the discussion at the Web.com Small Business Summit, and will share information and tools that small business owners can use to improve their risk profile; increase their online visibility; and optimize their online marketing efforts.

Topics and content at the Web.com Small Business Summit focus on ways small business owners can achieve a successful Internet presence, including the elements of a great website, how to determine if their website is working for them, increasing traffic to their website and business, mobile marketing, and decoding how to efficiently market their business on Google, Facebook and Twitter.

“As part of our commitment to give back to the communities we serve, we are pleased to offer this event which is focused on helping small business owners improve their business model,” said Leedy. “Every day, Web.com helps millions of business owners address the challenges of building and maintaining an effective online presence that allows their businesses to grow. We expect a lively dialogue covering a range of key, timely topics that small business owners face when tackling this increasingly important digital opportunity.”

Event Details:

  • Where: The Clubhouse at the TPC of the Twin Cities, 11444 Tournament Players Parkway, Blaine, MN
  • When: Thursday, July 30, 2015, registration, refreshments and networking 9:00 a.m.; presentation will start promptly at 10:00 a.m. and will conclude by 12:00 p.m.
  • Cost: Attendance is free, but advanced registration is requested at smallbusinesssummit.web.com
  • Social media: Twitter: @webdotcom / Facebook: Web.com / Hashtag: #SmallBizSummit
  • All attendees will receive a complimentary ticket to 3M Championship Presented by Post-it Products

For the schedule of all 2015 Web.com Small Business Summits or for more information about this Small Business Summit, go to the Web.com Small Business Summit website, or contact smallbusinesssummit@web.com, or call 800-862-8718.

Attention Editors/News Directors: Click here to view a brief video on what it’s like to attend a Web.com Small Business Summit event.

About Web.com

Web.com Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:WWWW) provides a full range of Internet services to small businesses to help them compete and succeed online. Web.com is owner of several global domain registrars and further meets the needs of small businesses anywhere along their lifecycle with affordable, subscription-based solutions including website design and management, search engine optimization, online marketing campaigns, local sales leads, social media, mobile products, eCommerce solutions and call center services. To get more information, visit www.web.com; follow Web.com on Twitter @webdotcom or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/web.com. For additional online marketing resources and small business networking, please visit Web.com’s Small Business Summit.

About the Champions Tour

Collectively, the Champions Tour has the most recognizable and accomplished players in the game, with many of its 32 members in the World Golf Hall of Fame competing regularly in its events. The Tour also counts numerous other major championship winners among its members. The Champions Tour is a membership organization of professional golfers age 50 and older. Conceived in 1980 as the Senior PGA Tour, it started with just four events and purses totaling $475,000. The Champions Tour’s primary purpose is to provide financial opportunities for its players, entertain and inspire its fans, deliver substantial value to its partners, create outlets for volunteers to give back, protect the integrity of the game and generate significant charitable and economic impact in communities in which it plays. Points earned in official Charles Schwab Cup events in 2014 determined Bernhard Langer as the Charles Schwab Cup champion, the season-long competition designed to recognize the Champions Tour’s leading player. The Commissioner of the PGA TOUR is Tim Finchem. Greg McLaughlin is President of the Champions Tour. The PGA TOUR’s website is pgatour.com, the No. 1 site in golf, and the organization is headquartered in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Follow the Champions Tour at facebook.com/ChampionsTour and on Twitter @ChampionsTour.

Note to Editors: Web.com is a registered trademark of Web.com Group, Inc.

Media Contact:
Ashley Clontz
Golin for Web.com
972-701-6974

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/web-com-invites-minneapolisst-paul-small-businesses-to-join-them-at-the-free/

Jul 22

Web.com to Host Small Business Summit to Help Northern Virginia Small …

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Jul 21, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE via COMTEX) —

Web.com

WWWW, -1.47%

a leading provider of Internet services and online marketing solutions for small businesses, will host a free Small Business Summit designed to help small business owners in the greater Prince William County area learn how to successfully increase their businesses’ visibility and better market themselves online. The Small Business Summit will take place on Tuesday, July 28, 2015 from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. in the Robert Trent Jones Golf Club in Gainesville, Virginia. Through Web.com’s agreement with the PGA TOUR and as umbrella sponsor of the Web.com Tour, Web.com developed the Small Business Summit as a benefit to small business owners in communities across the country.

“In today’s rapidly changing business world, entrepreneurs and small businesses are contributing significantly to the success of the Northern Virginia economy,” said Mike Antolini, tournament director for the Quicken Loans National. “To stay competitive in today’s marketplace, it is important for small business owners to build an online presence and learn the ins and outs of what it takes to be successful online. With the help of our corporate partners, Web.com and Bank of America, we are pleased to help local small business owners continue to prosper and grow while also having the chance to enjoy the Quicken Loans National experience.”

Justin Leedy, marketing director at Web.com will lead the discussion at the Web.com Small Business Summit, and will share information and tools that small business owners can use to improve their cash flow; increase their online visibility; and optimize their online marketing efforts.

Topics and content at the Small Business Summit focus on ways small business owners can achieve a successful Internet presence, including the elements of a great website, how to determine if their website is working for them, increasing traffic to their website and business, mobile marketing and decoding how to efficiently market their business on Google, Facebook and Twitter.

“As part of our commitment to give back to the communities we serve, we are pleased to offer this event which is focused on helping small business owners improve their business model,” said Leedy. “Every day, Web.com helps millions of business owners address the challenges of building and maintaining an effective online presence that allows their businesses to grow. We expect a lively dialogue covering a range of key, timely topics that small business owners face when tackling this increasingly important digital opportunity.”

Event Details:

  • Where: Robert Trent Jones Golf Club, 1 Turtle Point Drive, Gainesville, VA
  • When: Tuesday, July 28, 2015; registration, continental breakfast and networking 9:00 a.m.; presentation will start promptly at 10:00 a.m. and will conclude by 12:00 p.m.
  • Cost: Attendance is free, but advanced registration is requested at smallbusinesssummit.web.com
  • Social media: Twitter: @webdotcom / Facebook: Web.com / Hashtag: #SmallBizSummit
  • All attendees will receive a complimentary ticket to the Quicken Loans National Tournament

For the schedule of all 2015 Web.com Small Business Summits or for more information about this Small Business Summit, go to the Web.com Small Business Summit website, or contact smallbusinesssummit@web.com, or call 800-862-8718.

Attention Editors/News Directors: Click here to view a brief video on what it’s like to attend a Web.com Small Business Summit event.

About Web.com

Web.com Group, Inc.

WWWW, -1.47%

provides a full range of Internet services to small businesses to help them compete and succeed online. Web.com is owner of several global domain registrars and further meets the needs of small businesses anywhere along their lifecycle with affordable, subscription-based solutions including website design and management, search engine optimization, online marketing campaigns, local sales leads, social media, mobile products, eCommerce solutions and call center services. To get more information, visit web.com; follow Web.com on Twitter @webdotcom or on Facebook at facebook.com/web.com. For additional online marketing resources and small business networking, please visit Web.com’s Small Business Summit.

About PGA TOUR

The PGA TOUR is the world’s premier membership organization for touring professional golfers, co-sanctioning more than 130 tournaments on the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour, Web.com Tour, PGA TOUR Latinoamérica, PGA TOUR Canada and PGA TOUR China.

The PGA TOUR’s mission is to entertain and inspire its fans, deliver substantial value to its partners, create outlets for volunteers to give back, generate significant charitable and economic impact in the communities in which it plays, and provide financial opportunities for TOUR players.

Worldwide, PGA TOUR tournaments are broadcast to more than 1 billion households in 225 countries and territories in 32 languages. Virtually all tournaments are organized as non-profit organizations in order to maximize charitable giving. In 2013, tournaments across all Tours generated more than $134 million for local and national charitable organizations and in early 2014 the TOUR’s all-time charitable contributions surpassed $2 billion.

The PGA TOUR’s web site is PGATOUR.COM, the No. 1 site in golf, and the organization is headquartered in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.

Note to Editors: Web.com is a registered trademark of Web.com Group, Inc.

 CONTACT: Media Contact: Ashley Clontz Golin for Web.com 972-701-6974 AClontz@golin.com 

Copyright (C) 2015 GlobeNewswire, Inc. All rights reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/web-com-to-host-small-business-summit-to-help-northern-virginia-small/

Jul 21

The Cross-Border Series Part 2: Establishing A Search Marketing Strategy In …

european-union-flag-ss-1920

For businesses around the world seeking growth, expanding to Europe is an excellent opportunity. Europeans, who number over 500 million (per collective official country estimates), have some of the world’s highest disposable household incomes (per an OECD index) and drive a massive regional e-commerce industry valued at EUR 200 billion and growing at just under 20% annually, per an Accenture US-EU cross border study.

The single most important fact to consider when developing a European marketing strategy is that Europeans should not be approached as a single market or customer type. While many European countries do share similarities, such as regulations and a common currency via the European Union, each country has its own unique culture forged through millennia of history.

Things To Consider When Formulating A European Business Strategy

There are many differences between Europe and the United States — cultural, economic and legal. Here are a few to keep in mind when developing a European business strategy and setting up your search campaigns.

The Basics

There are many different conventions — written and spoken — that exist for basic cultural elements, including:

  • Date. In most European countries, the day is placed before the month — so, “July 21, 2015″ would be written as “21 July 2015″ or “21/7/2015.”
  • Time. Many European countries use the 24-hour clock (e.g., 17:00, not 5:00 p.m.).
  • Decimal marks. Important for pricing, most countries in Europe use a comma — not a period — to denote decimals (e.g., €19,99 instead of $19.99).
  • Measurement. All European countries use the metric system (e.g., centimeters, not inches).
  • Currency. Keep in mind that not all countries in Europe have adopted the Euro currency.

Image from iGlobalStores.com

Image from iGlobalStores.com

Seasonality and purchasing habits also differ from country to country, particularly between northern and southern European countries. For example, according to Bing European Mobile Specialist Milka Kramer, “Spanish searchers tend to book travel last-minute in July/August, while UK searchers begin booking in January with activity peaking in April.”

Europeans also celebrate a wide diversity of holidays, both religious and national, across and even within countries, sometimes even observing the same holiday on different dates. Take Mother’s Day, which is widely celebrated in Europe but falls on a different day of the year across countries:

  • Norway: Second Sunday of February
  • Ireland the UK: Fourth Sunday during the period of Lent
  • Spain Portugal: First Sunday of May
  • Most European countries: Second Sunday of May
  • Poland: The 26th of May
  • France: Last Sunday of May (or first Sunday of June, depending on Pentecost)

Economic Factors

Another reason it’s not a good idea to apply a single strategy across Europe is that each country has a different economic climate that will affect your product’s optimal price. Using a single approach will price your products too high for some countries (producing lower conversion rates and inefficient spend) and too low for others (producing higher conversion rates but eating into your profit margins).

Your pricing across different countries will be affected by a variety of factors. You’ll need to consider taxes and duties — value added tax (VAT) rates vary across Europe and can range from 4.5% (Andorra) to 27% (Hungary) — as well as cost of living, disposable income, currency exchange rates, shipping costs and return rates, cost per customer acquisition and product scarcity.

European-VAT-Rates-1024x954

Image from iGlobalStores.com

Many European countries have high costs of living, yet cost of living varies greatly across the continent, and even within countries. Customers in Norway, for example, may be used to higher prices, while customers in Spain may balk at the same price for the same product.

To maximize your return on investment, you must take into account these different variables and pricing pressures when developing your product pricing strategy. To help manage this process, it’s a good idea to organize a database of each pricing variable by country, along with your cost of goods sold, so that you can easily determine what price ranges make sense. Also, to optimize your marketing yield, include as many relevant data points as possible, such as competitive presence and prices, referral rates, organic sales and repeat business.

Maintain this database as your data is updated to fine-tune your pricing model, and measure performance at different price points to learn where your success rates are highest.

Legal Factors

Some European countries have stricter laws and regulations than others surrounding issues such as user data collection, return policies and packaging/labeling.

discovery-uk-legal-notice-screenshot

A cookie policy notice from Discovery’s UK website. [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

It’s important to ensure that your business abides by each applicable rule; refer to the European Commission website or the United States’ Export.gov website to help understand which regulations apply to your business, and how. Additionally, make sure that your ads comply with editorial rules, which differ by country for highly regulated industries like Trademark, Gambling and Pharmacy.

Internet Penetration Rates

Another consideration to keep in mind when establishing your European strategy is internet penetration rates. Some countries may have large populations but a low internet penetration rate, which lowers their total reachable population. While there are several examples of this dynamic, the most notable example is the UK, which has ~1 million fewer people than France, but ~4 million more internet users. See the data in this graph from an International Telecommunication Union study.

internet penetration rates europe

Internet Population vs. Total Population In European countries. [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

Language Expectations

While 51% of Europeans do understand English (per a European Commission study), many countries speak their own language or a mix of languages and dialects. (Switzerland has four official languages, and within Spain, the region of Catalonia speaks Catalan.)

“Some countries are mostly fine with [being marketed to in] English,” notes Massimo Guerrato, an online marketing expert and entrepreneur in Italy, “but others are used to having everything localized and translated, with even TV being ‘dubbed.’”

Even if your business is not ready to invest in translation and localization, you still have many options. For marketing in countries where English is not the official language, the Netherlands and Nordic countries (Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland) are your best bet. According to Jesper Riedel, Bing European Search Advertising Lead in Nordic Countries Netherlands:

English proficiency is really high [in these countries]; according to the Education First English Proficiency Index, the best countries globally for English comprehension begin with Denmark, Netherlands, Sweden, Finland and Norway. Obviously, it’s always best to communicate in local language, and from an ad perspective you often have to. But as an e-business you can direct users to an English language page and still see excellent conversions, and then decide later if revenue potential justifies localization of your web presence.

english language skill europe

Image from Eupedia.com, based on data from Wikipedia.

Planning Expansion With A Staged Approach

Overall, expansion into some countries requires less effort than it does in others, suggesting that a staged approach is the best way to develop your European strategy. The following countries are advisable to begin with, given they are less costly places to test a strategy.

The United Kingdom and Ireland are natural first choices for expansion into Europe, given that they require no language translation; but don’t forget to localize your keywords, ads, website and price points!

Nordic countries (Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland and Iceland) and the Netherlands are ideal second-stage expansion countries. That’s because these countries have very high internet penetration rates per the ITU study, top the world in English language skills, and have thriving e-commerce economies.

Germany, Austria and Switzerland follow as third-stage countries given their good English language skills, high internet penetration rates and bustling economies. In addition to reaching the most populous European country, translating your brand and marketing messaging into German will help you to reach customers in Switzerland and Austria, too.

Keep in mind that although it is possible to market to these lower-cost, non-native English countries without translating your ads or landing pages, your conversion rates and ROI will be sub-optimal until you put in the effort to fully optimize your customer experience for each country.

household income vs population

Household Income vs Internet Population by country [CLICK TO ENLARGE]

The following countries are suitable for a later-stage expansion and should be approached after you have established a successful strategy with the above countries.

While France has the third largest economy in Europe, its internet penetration rate and English comprehension factors make it a more costly market to prepare for. However, an additional benefit of translating into French is that Belgium and Luxembourg, two wealthy countries, also speak French.

Italy and Spain are two of the largest European economies and most populous countries, yet they rank lower in the consideration set for European expansion given their lower English comprehension rates, lower internet penetration rates, and lower usage of the internet for the purpose of purchasing products or services (per an eMarketer study).

emarketer italy spain internet usage

Keep an eye on Poland, too, which has a large population and a fast-growing economy. Consequently, the country is being recognized as an expansion target for commerce companies such as Toys R Us.

These are just a few aspects to consider when setting up a European marketing strategy; if you have additional context, ideas or lessons learned, please feel free to add your thoughts to the comments section.

Optimizing Your Search Campaigns For European Customers

Let’s continue with some search marketing nitty-gritty. Read on for best practices that you can use to set up and optimize your search campaigns to effectively target European customers.

The first step when expanding to a country that speaks another language is to translate and localize your keyword set. The best way to translate is to work with a native speaker, as this helps prevent the language, dialect and cultural nuanced artifacts that come with translation technology.

Next, localize your marketing messages; you’ll want to do this even if you are expanding into a country that shares the same language. If you have the resources, set up localized experiences for all customer touch points including your ads, landing page, website, online chat, call center and post-sales emails.

The next step involves performing keyword research relevant to the markets you are expanding into. To pull in-market data, use the Bing Ads Intelligence add-on for Microsoft Excel and select your target country using the drop-down selector in the BAI ribbon (arrow “A” in the image below).

bing-ads-intelligence-excel

[CLICK TO ENLARGE]

From here, you’ll want to use the following keyword research reports (we’ll use an example product of “black dresses”).

Traffic Report (“B”). This report shows search data on how many people are searching for “black dresses,” which can help you predict how much volume you can expect for your (exact) keyword lists, rather than making a broad, top-down estimate based on marketplace data. Here is a sample traffic report for native keywords with in-market statistics for eight countries, inclusive of all device traffic:

BAI traffic report

Keyword Performance (“C”). This report shows marketplace performance data for your keyword(s) — in this case, just “black dresses” — with total impressions, clicks, cost, click-through rates (CTRs) and costs per click (CPCs). This report will even provide suggested bids broken out by match type, device type or position. Here is a sample keyword performance report, inclusive of all match types and devices:

BAI keyword performance report

Keyword Suggestions (“D”). This report can provide in-market native-language research to find additional relevant keywords, which is important for reaching additional customers that your 1:1 translated keyword set could otherwise miss.

Here is a sample table of data from a suggested list of keyword suggestions for Germany (“schwarzes kleid”), for exact matches inclusive of all devices. Just remember to double-check every term to be sure they are products you sell. (Note: A few columns from the normal report were omitted in this image to make this table easier to read.)

BAI keyword suggestions report

After establishing your keyword set, you’ll want to break out your new campaigns by country, which can be done a few different ways.

Creating a separate account for each country gives you the most flexibility in managing campaigns, billing and reporting, and it precludes the need to condense several campaigns or ad groups into a single each country.

Creating separate campaigns for each country still provides good optimization control, but it may create a convoluted account. If you don’t want to run multiple accounts but need multiple campaigns per country, you can use a country-code append-style system (e.g., dresses_UK, dresses_Germany).

Creating separate ad groups for each country is another method, but it lessens your ability to control budgets and hinders optimization efforts. Simply turning on country-specific targeting settings is not recommended, as it does not allow you to translate/localize your messaging and significantly reduces your ability to optimize by country.

The last step is to do your competitive research. You can search with a local lens by going to bing.com, clicking the gear icon in the top right, and selecting “Settings” from the drop-down menu. From there, click the “Worldwide” tab and select the country for which you want to do research.

bing-settings-worldwide

 

Search for your branded, category and top products, and take notes on the ads that appear to help you position your marketing messaging, looking for ad copy call-to-action, product pricing, shipping costs and density of competitors (or lack thereof).

Please feel free to share and comment if you have additional tips or lessons learned. Happy optimizing!

I want to conclude by giving a big thank you to the following European Experts who contributed advice: Marius Hals, Jesper Riedel, Milka Kramer, Leslie Fons, Ellen Akkerman, Maedhbh Bradley, and Massimo Guerrato.


Some opinions expressed in this article may be those of a guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.


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About The Author

(Some images used under license from Shutterstock.com.)

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/the-cross-border-series-part-2-establishing-a-search-marketing-strategy-in/

Jul 20

New security service helps protect the Internet of Things

Internet of Things

The Internet of Things is growing fast, according to Gartner around 4.9 billion devices will be in use this year, up 30 percent on 2014, and there could be 25 billion IoT devices by 2020.

But with all of these devices being rushed to market security can be left behind. According to managed security specialist Trustwave’s 2015 Security Pressures Report, 77 percent of respondents said they had been pressured to unveil IT projects that were not security ready.

To combat this issue, Trustwave is announcing a new set of managed security services — Trustwave Managed IoT Security. These services are designed to help manufacturers and developers of Internet of Things technologies identify and fix security vulnerabilities within their products before they hit the market, as well as helping business end users using IoT technologies prevent IoT-related cyber-attacks.

“As everyday objects connect to the network, IT teams struggle to manage assets and attack vectors previously outside their purview,” says Steve Kelley, Senior Vice President of Product and Corporate Marketing at Trustwave. “Manufacturers of those products also struggle with getting them out to market on time while ensuring security. Trustwave’s Managed IoT Security helps both parties overcome those challenges by identifying and remediating security weaknesses within the products and ecosystem surrounding them in addition to round the clock monitoring to detect and deflect a breach”.

Trustwave Managed IoT Security works on two levels. Developers and providers of IoT products and services can use it to find weaknesses in embedded devices, back-end services and the connections in between. Trustwave’s elite team of ‘SpiderLabs’ ethical hackers attempt to compromise devices by exploiting vulnerabilities in the hardware, software and the manufacturers’ servers that provide the link between IoT devices and applications.

In addition it monitors the security of the IoT ecosystem. This helps protect organisations from the security challenge brought about by a raft of new and unusual, devices. Businesses can access Trustwave’s Managed IoT Security services through the company’s cloud-based portal, Trustwave TrustKeeper.

Managed IoT Security will launch on Wednesday (22 July) and more information will be available on the Trustwave website.

Image Credit: PlusONE / Shutterstock

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/new-security-service-helps-protect-the-internet-of-things/

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