Dec 07

Columbus welcomes Web Wisconsin

Bob Turner, co-owner of Web Wisconsin, shows some of the digital marketing agency’s services during an interview Nov. 27. Turner’s business was home-based for 17 years before moving to an office location in downtown Columbus in late October.

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/columbus-welcomes-web-wisconsin/

Dec 06

Marketer pitches hot sauce to ‘alt-right’

Jeremy Bernstein, who splits his time between Miami Beach and New York, is marketing his brand of hot sauce as “the spiciest sauce this side of the wall.”

“The wall” being one that President Donald Trump wants built to keep Mexican immigrants from crossing the border illegally into the United States.

Bernstein’s Hot Pepe’s “Over the Wall” Hot Sauce could be the first food product marketed to the “alt-right,” a political grouping or tendency mixing racism, white nationalism, anti-Semitism and populism.

The slogan on his Hot Pepe’s website reads: “Crafted with 100 percent culturally-appropriated ingredients, it’s guaranteed to produce Regressive Liberal and SJW tears. It is Muy Picante, my friends! Believe me.”

But Bernstein’s sauce, which he sells for $9.95 a bottle online, has gotten him into hot water.

Hot Pepe’s logo is a frog sporting all the accoutrements of a Mexican stereotype: a sombrero, a thick black mustache and a taco in its hand. The problem is, it bears too close a resemblance to a cartoon frog created by cartoonist Matt Furie in a 2005 comic called “Boy’s Club.”

Furie’s green anthropomorphic frog grew into a popular internet meme on websites like Tumblr and 4chan by 2008. But over the past year, it has been appropriated as a symbol of the alt-right movement.

Furie is furious that Bernstein, a former writer for the pro-Trump website Big League Politics who filmed himself at a march at an alt-right, anti-Islam rally in New York in June and posted the video to YouTube, has used his character to market a product to the alt-right.

Miami New Times reports that Furie’s legal team WilmerHale sent Bernstein a cease-and-desist letter to demand he stop using Furie’s copyrighted amphibian.

“I got cease-and-desisted by WilmerHale,” Bernstein told New Times in late November. “But Furie doesn’t have a trademark on it. They can’t cease-and-desist me. They tried. But he never trademarked it.”

Apparently, they can. Furie, who doesn’t want his cartoon character used as symbol of racism and intolerance, aggressively enforces his intellectual property, the media site Motherboard/Vice reports.

In August, Furie’s lawyers settled with Eric Hauser, a former assistant principal in Texas who appropriated Pepe the Frog’s image for use in an Islamophobic children’s book.

Furie’s lawyers forced Hauser to stop selling the book and made him donate his profits to the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

Bernstein claims that Pepe the Frog is public domain but told Miami New Times that his lawyer “buddy” told him he couldn’t trademark the image.

Despite Hot Pepe’s image on the product and its website ad tagline — “Over The Wall is Made In The USA and endorsed by Vladimir Putin’s longest-living chef. Be a bad hombre on the right side of the wall” — Bernstein told New Times that his product wasn’t a symbol of racial intolerance. Instead, its inspiration comes, Raw Story reports, from a 4chan meme that mocks autistic people.

Bernstein told New Times that the sauce was intended to be used on chicken tenders, in reference to the 4chan “chicken tendies” meme. On that lengthy meme, people post stories about an autistic, overweight character complaining about “normie” people and who demands chicken tendies.

Bernstein, New Times reported, offered to ship the alt-weekly a free sample. New Times declined.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/marketer-pitches-hot-sauce-to-alt-right/

Dec 05

7 side hustles for boomers and millennials – WXIA

For baby boomers, parent-preneurs and millennials alike, the prospect of a side hustle is a tempting one. The appeal is easy to see. Side hustles are an easy, effective means to realize a range of goals, be it earning some extra cash or plunging into a long-deferred dream career.

In the United States today, millennials are the most likely to have side gigs, and not always for economic reasons. Many also use side hustles to both find fulfillment and exercise their creativity. One millennial even calls freelance writing “a hedge against feeling stuck and dull and cheated by life.

”It’s much the same for retirees. Side hustles are an opportunity for retirees to reinvent themselves, and along the way, build and maintain an active social life. Recent studies show that working longer can yield many unexpected benefits, such as having a daily schedule, a sense of purpose, social interaction and even strengthening one’s mental and cognitive abilities.

Side hustles are also ideal for parent-preneurs — who, as the name suggests — must juggle parenthood with their entrepreneurial journey. Side hustles allow parent-preneurs to earn a living at their own pace without sacrificing time with their children. With a side hustle, parent-preneurs can have it all.

Let’s look at the 7 best side hustles for everyone.

Graphic Designer

As advertising adjusts to the unique challenges of the internet, content marketing — where businesses advertise through articles, videos and graphics — has become a growth industry. Today, graphic design work has never been easier to find. There is a multitude of platforms for aspiring freelancers, including basic operations such as Fiverr to more professional forums like 99designs. Bear in mind that the sites offering high-paying, reliable clients often vet freelancers carefully. So, if you want to be a freelance designer, make sure you have a strong online portfolio.

Consulting

If you love your career but want more flexibility and choice, consulting is a win-win situation. An organization can benefit from your hard-won expertise, and you can work in a familiar, comfortable environment — without the stresses of a full-time position.

You can also set both your hours and your role. Depending on your preferences, you can log work on a contract or part-time position, or create something in-between. You also have a say in your responsibilities, such as choosing to work as a troubleshooter or perhaps addressing large, systemic problems. For this reason, parent-preneurs should find consulting an ideal role which offers considerable autonomy and adaptability — a godsend given the unpredictability of life with children.

Writer

Freelance content writers have seen similar growth, be it blogging or writing internet ad copy. Because content marketing has grown so quickly, there is rarely a shortage of potential clients, who can range from travel agencies to trucking companies. Even if you’ve never worked as a professional journalist, writing is a skill which can be improved upon with practice.

Best of all, writers don’t need specialized software, just a computer, a personal website with a portfolio and a reliable internet connection.

Pet-sitter and Dog Walker

If you love animals, pet-sitting offers the best of both worlds. You can enjoy the company of friendly animals without having to take care of them over their lifetimes. One New York-based pet-sitter earned $8,000 over two months. Not bad for spending time with furry friends!

Home sharing

If you’re a snowbird who only lives in one place for a few months a year or an empty-nester with spare rooms, consider renting out your home. If you have safety concerns, using reputable home sharing platforms will allow you to approve potential guests. High-end services go one step further, carefully vetting both hosts and guests and restricting their base to a narrow group of people.

Make and Sell Products Online

The rise of online marketplaces has enabled a host of artsy upstarts to host their own stores and reach customers.

The strengths of these internet markets are their reach and accessibility. As a creator, you no longer need to choose between catering to a large retail chain (unfeasible for many creatives who require volume and certain aesthetics) or local flea markets (often limited by geography). Instead, creators can build their own niches online, allowing customers to order products from their storefronts with just a click of the mouse — all while cutting down on overhead costs.

Parent-preneurs take note: selling handmade products online isn’t just potentially lucrative — it’s also a fun experience for the family. After all, children with a passion for the arts will make willing assistants, or at the very least, eager students.

Translate

If you are fluent in another language, consider working as a translator. Online platforms, such as Rev or One Hour, offer a variety of language services from business interpreting to document translation. Depending on your employer, you could assist a company in translating a pitch proposal for foreign investors or help a doctor speak to patients.

For a parent-preneur, it could also be a good opening to introduce your children to a language.

A word to the wise…

Times are changing. The rise of the internet and the gig economy has allowed boomers, parent-preneurs and millennials alike to monetize their hobbies and make some extra cash. Whatever your age, a side hustle can serve several purposes, such as strengthening your safety net, padding your bank account, or making some new friends along the way.

Whatever side hustle you choose, make sure you stand out from your competitors! Get started by visiting GoDaddy GoCentral to build a professional website — be it a beautiful portfolio of glossy designs or a cute storefront packed with whimsical products.

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/7-side-hustles-for-boomers-and-millennials-wxia/

Dec 04

Maine Compass: Open hearings needed before harmful ruling on net neutrality

The Federal Communications Commission is about to release a new order on net neutrality under the moniker “Restoring Internet Freedom.” In our opinion, this rule — which the FCC is poised to enact in less than two weeks — will ensure that the internet is controlled by a handful of large multinational companies that will be in a position to extort money from small businesses attempting to develop innovative new internet-based products and services.

The draft order will define internet access as an information service, rather than a telecommunications service. The change in definition would transfer the responsibility for regulating competitive practices on the internet from the FCC to the Federal Trade Commission. The problem is that the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in California has ruled that the FTC has no enforcement powers over broadband providers that also offer landline, mobile and other telecommunications services — which is nearly all of them. In other words, no one will have the ability to enforce fair practices on the internet.

Without a watchdog with enforcement authority over business practices, the nation’s largest internet service providers would be able to restrict trade and innovation on the internet in a variety of ways:

• Large ISPs could charge extra for bandwidth suitable for video streaming. Large providers like Google, Amazon and Netflix have already built their own content delivery networks to mitigate this risk, but new entrants wanting to bring better, more innovative and perhaps more cost-effective services to market would find themselves unable to provide a marketable service without paying extra – limiting consumer choice and increasing prices.

• Cable companies and phone companies would be able to limit the flow of voice-over-internet protocol traffic by other providers on their networks, such as Vonage, Magic Jack, 8×8 and our own company. This could severely hamper or even put these companies out of business.

• Internet service providers could block access to websites, gaming networks and content that haven’t paid for transport on the network, limiting consumer options for entertainment, shopping and education.

As a business executive in a telecommunications company, I don’t see the elimination of net-neutrality rules as “pro-business,” “pro-internet freedom” or even “pro-telecommunications.” Small to mid-sized businesses hoping to offer innovative, competitive services are at risk of being squeezed out of the marketplace by larger competitors.

Who does benefit? A handful of very large companies including Comcast, Charter, Verizon and Level 3 that would seek to leverage their market dominance and control traffic on the internet in the interest of limiting competition and increasing their own profits.

Given that this move is more “pro-trust” than “pro-business,” it’s also very discouraging that it has become a partisan issue in some quarters, with the Republicans on the FCC — Brendan Carr, Michael O’Rielly and Chairman Ajit Pai — backing the new rule and Democrats Mignon Clyburn and Jessica Rosenworcel dissenting. It’s a somewhat different scenario in the Maine congressional delegation. There, Republicans are divided: 2nd District Rep. Bruce Poliquin supports the measure and Sen. Susan Collins is against it, as are Rep. Chellie Pingree, D-1st District, and independent Sen. Angus King.

There appears to be disturbing evidence that hacking techniques and fraud are once again being used to stifle public opinion. During the public comment period for this rulemaking process last summer, nearly 22 million comments came in, but many, including the FCC’s Rosenworcel and New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, have pointed out that a lot of the comments in favor of the proposed rule changes are alleged to have come from bots and even dead people.

In addition, access to the comment site by legitimate citizens was blocked for a time in May by what the FCC claims was a denial-of-service attack; the Government Accountability Office will be looking into the attack at the request of two members of Congress. As a result of these irregularities, Rosenworcel has called for open, public hearings before the FCC brings this order to a vote Dec. 14, a call supported by Sen. King and others.

In the interest of transparency and integrity in the rulemaking process, Otelco supports Rosenworcel’s call for open hearings before the FCC’s upcoming vote, which will almost surely bring about the end of network neutrality. We encourage readers of this newspaper to reach out to the FCC and our congressional delegation to support an open process.

Trevor Jones is vice president of marketing, sales and customer service for Otelco, parent company of the New Gloucester-based telecommunications provider OTT Communications.


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Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/maine-compass-open-hearings-needed-before-harmful-ruling-on-net-neutrality/

Dec 03

Finding your niche online

LIMA — Doing business and doing business online can sometimes be very different.

The Allen County Chamber of Commerce hosted its monthly Wake, Rattle and Roll with this month’s focus on finding your niche. Panelists Ed Kirk, sales manager of Just 4 U Scrubs and Quick as a Wink, Elizabeth Leis, owner of Nitza’s, and Jennifer Velasquez, owner of Pointe of Joy, discussed their best-selling practices and what makes their businesses unique.

Kirk says a direct market approach is what made Just 4 U Scrubs successful. Instead of just online sales, the company convinced local medical facilities to buy their items from them. As a result, the company became the No. 1 dealer of the Dickies brand out of eastern Ohio, eastern Kentucky and West Virginia within 10 months of sales.

“We took business away from the internet,” he said. “That was our business model.”

Quick as a Wink uses the internet as well as in-person services. Kirk said 70 percent of the jobs the company provides is in person and the other jobs are online.

Besides sales, Kirk says Just 4 U Scrubs is unique because he sends out cards to each online customer as as a way to say thank you.

“When was the last time you’ve received a business card? ” he asked. “It’s something that you can do to make it personal.”

Velasquez said last year over five percent of the company’s business was from online sales and 15 percent was through marketing on Instagram and Facebook. Just recently she used Facebook to market busy moms. For an hour customers could ask questions about products and the customers could buy the product while they were online.

“It went well,” she said. “We had a goal and we doubled our goals in sales that night,” she said.

Not only has her company done well online, but its done even better with its in-store sales.She is grateful for her in-store customers and is committed to giving back.

“I think that it’s important to be involved in the community,” she said. “Not just about coming in and shopping, but actually building those relationships with people in the community.”

Leis said her business does most of its sales in store and very little online. However, if customers go online and search for a specific brand the manufacturer will have a store locator that will direct them to her store. Online isn’t an option for her company because the clothing is not made in large quantities so orders are usually made over the phone or through Facebook.

“It’s the personal service and the unique clothing that we have in there that makes us unique,” she said.

Host Marc Bowker, owner of Alter Ego Comics, said small business in Allen County is alive and well.

“I think that we are providing better services where people can come generation after generation,” he said. “I think that is one of the reasons we have experienced success is because we are passionate about what we do.”

By Camri Nelson

cnelson@limanews.com

Reach Camri Nelson at 567-242-0456 or on Twitter @CamriNews

Reach Camri Nelson at 567-242-0456 or on Twitter @CamriNews

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/finding-your-niche-online/

Dec 02

Internet Marketing Explained – Boca Raton News Most Reliable …

By Billy Peery

Traditional Marketing is intuitive.

You pay to have your business featured on a billboard, newspaper, or TV ad, potential customers see it, and they end up coming to you with their needs.

Internet Marketing is, in some ways, just as simple: you pay to be seen on the Internet, and this leads to people choosing your business.

Of course, it doesn’t make as much sense as it used to.

Why?

Because it’s hard to know where to put your money,

Do you write an ad, pay Google to feature it, and hope for the best?

Do you focus on existing customers by sending out regular newsletters?

Do you pay a Search Engine Optimizer to help you rank well on Google, even though you don’t really know what a Search Engine Optimizer does?

It can all get very confusing, very fast.

Over the next several months, we’ll be focusing on one aspect of Internet Marketing, SEO. I’ll guide you by the hand, so that by the time we’re done, you’ll know more about ranking well in Google and Bing than the majority of business owners.

But before we get to that, I want to explain the various types of Internet Marketing. They all have their place and are of varying usefulness, depending on your needs.

By the end of this article, you should have an idea of which areas you can see the greatest ROI on.

 

PPC

Let’s start with pay per click (PPC) marketing.

Of all the various Internet Marketing strategies, this one most resembles old school marketing tactics.

Basically, you pay a search engine to put your website at the top of the results for certain keywords.

If you’re a plumber in Boca Raton, you might target the keyword, “Boca Raton Plumber”.

You’ll create an ad that has a title and description for your site. Here are the ads that currently display for “Boca Raton Plumber”:

Once you’ve created the ad, you have to bid for placement. Essentially, you’ll tell the search engine how much you want to pay in order to get someone to click the link to your site. This bid is called the cost per click.

The search engine will look at your proposed cost per click, as well as the perceived quality of the page you’re trying to display (its quality is determined by looking at a combination of click through rate and relevance to the searcher’s query).

It will then rank the potential paid search results and show them accordingly.

This form of advertising is best for those who need results fast. While many forms of Internet Marketing take a while to gain traction, PPC starts directing traffic to your site as soon as you have it set up.

That makes it great for promotional events, but it does come with some drawbacks. For one, it doesn’t scale very well. You’re always going to pay a set amount for every lead you get to a website. And it can quickly get expensive if you’re not careful.

The key is to watch your metrics closely. Determine how much you’re spending per visitor, the percentage of website visitors that convert into customers, and how much money you can make per customer.

If the amount you’re spending to get leads that turn into customers outweighs the amount you’re making with these customers, you’ll want to make changes to your campaign.

Most PPC marketers watch their metrics closely. They create landing pages designed to convert customers and constantly tweak their headlines, descriptions, and keywords to find the best results.

 

Social Media Marketing

Social Media Marketing is the broadest form of Internet Marketing we’ll talk about.

There are many different social media networks you can use — Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, etc. — and many different strategies you can employ to build your business.

If your business is something trendy like fashion or food, you’ll want to learn about Influencer Marketing and Instagram Marketing.

But for most businesses, there’s only one network you’ll want to focus on in the beginning: Facebook.

There are two simple things you can do with it.

For one, you’ll want to create a Facebook page. This gives your business credibility, allows you to share important information with customers, and helps them to connect with you.

Facebook explains how to create a business page here. One important thing to note is that you’re not creating a profile. Those are meant for people, and your customers are less likely to friend a business profile than they are to like a page.

The second thing you’ll be interested in are Facebook ads. Even this sliver of social media marketing can get complicated, so business owners new to Internet Marketing will want to start small with retargeting ads.

Essentially, you’ll set up your website with Facebook Pixel. This tells Facebook who’s been on your website. You then target these people with ads.

This is useful, because people who have already visited your site are more likely to become customers. They’re essentially ‘warm’ leads.

Targeting them with ads makes them more likely to buy from you. This method is particularly useful if you sell on your website. Even if you only sell through a physical location, though, these ads will help keep you in a potential customer’s mind.

Once you’ve gotten familiar with Facebook Ads, you might want to go deeper into its features. Facebook allows you to target very specific demographics, and the people who find the most success often tweak their demographics to determine their most likely audience.

 

Newsletter Marketing

Newsletter Marketing is all about taking warm leads and turning them into customers.

People come to your website and like what they see: maybe they’re interested in your product, maybe they see you as an authority in your field.

Whatever the reason, they’re interested in your business, but they’re not ready to spend any money.

The process, then, is simple. Probably the simplest of any marketing strategy we discuss in this post.

You collect their email, then send them occasional newsletters.

To get their email, simply let them know you have a newsletter. You can do this with a pop-up on your site or a Call to Action at the end of blog posts. Some businesses incentivize email signups by offering a downloadable PDF in exchange for an email address.

Once you have email addresses, you start sending out newsletters. Monthly newsletters are usually effective: they appear often enough to keep businesses in people’s minds, but not so often as to appear annoying.

That said, if you have enough to talk about, weekly newsletters are also common. For ecommerce stores running frequent deals, even daily frequency can be appropriate.

The real key is to make sure you’re providing value to subscribers. Give them actionable advice and offer good deals. Depending on your niche, personal stories can also provide value.

The presence and ratio of these things will vary depending on your business, but the point is simple: a newsletter allows leads and existing customers to form a deeper connection with you. This leads to trust, which then leads to sales.

 

SEO

Now we get to my field of specialization: Search Engine Optimization (SEO).

The goal is similar to PPC, but whereas PPC helps you rank in the ads section, SEO helps you rank in the normal, “organic” section of the search engine results page.

Here are the organic results that display when you type in “Boca Raton Plumber”:

As you can see with the Briggs Plumbing listing, businesses do rank on this page. However, search results feature a variety of pages, and so this one also features HomeAdvisor, Yelp, Angie’s List, and Better Business Bureau.

Different pages are going to have different sorts of results, depending both on how strongly various websites have optimized for search engines and which results Google thinks searchers would most like to see.

If we look at the other results ranking on the first page for this term, we can see some more results from businesses:

All of these results are similar to PPC ads, with their titles and descriptions. The major difference is that they lack the green “Ad” indicator.

One of the big advantages of SEO is that people are more likely to click on results that aren’t ads. With PPC, though, you have a bit more control over your positioning, because a main determining factor is how much you bid for ad placement.

With SEO, you’re not paying a search engine to help you rank well. Instead, you’re making sure your site is built in such a way that it appeals to searchers: creating content that thoroughly meets people’s needs when they’ve typed in a query like, “Boca Raton Plumber”.

You also make sure your site has links from high-quality sites pointed in its direction. Links are one of a search engine’s best ways of determining which sites are high-quality. And thus, which sites should rank well on a given search engine results page.

SEO is probably the most complex form of Internet Marketing we’re discussing in this article, but don’t worry. We’ll cover things in more detail in future columns.

For now, you simply need to know that SEO is a great way of getting new leads. It’s a bit like an investment. You put time — or money, if you’re hiring a Search Engine Optimizer — into building the content and links that help you rank well in Google.

These assets don’t then go away. Instead, good SEO work can help you rank well for high-performing keywords for years to come.

 

Internet Marketing in Boca Raton

That covers the basic aspects of Internet Marketing, but it’s impossible to give more than a basic overview in this amount of time.

If any of the forms of marketing above appeal to you, I’d recommend reaching out to an expert who can determine how these forms of marketing could help accelerate your business.

If you’re interested in SEO, we’ll feature plenty of information for you in the next couple months. Stay tuned!


About the Author

Billy Peery is an SEO expert working in Delray Beach. He’s written for Shopify, Cracked, Harvard Student Agencies, and a surprisingly large number of moving companies. Find out more about his Delray Beach SEO work here.

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/internet-marketing-explained-boca-raton-news-most-reliable/

Dec 01

Internet Marketing Explained

By Billy Peery

Traditional Marketing is intuitive.

You pay to have your business featured on a billboard, newspaper, or TV ad, potential customers see it, and they end up coming to you with their needs.

Internet Marketing is, in some ways, just as simple: you pay to be seen on the Internet, and this leads to people choosing your business.

Of course, it doesn’t make as much sense as it used to.

Why?

Because it’s hard to know where to put your money,

Do you write an ad, pay Google to feature it, and hope for the best?

Do you focus on existing customers by sending out regular newsletters?

Do you pay a Search Engine Optimizer to help you rank well on Google, even though you don’t really know what a Search Engine Optimizer does?

It can all get very confusing, very fast.

Over the next several months, we’ll be focusing on one aspect of Internet Marketing, SEO. I’ll guide you by the hand, so that by the time we’re done, you’ll know more about ranking well in Google and Bing than the majority of business owners.

But before we get to that, I want to explain the various types of Internet Marketing. They all have their place and are of varying usefulness, depending on your needs.

By the end of this article, you should have an idea of which areas you can see the greatest ROI on.

 

PPC

Let’s start with pay per click (PPC) marketing.

Of all the various Internet Marketing strategies, this one most resembles old school marketing tactics.

Basically, you pay a search engine to put your website at the top of the results for certain keywords.

If you’re a plumber in Boca Raton, you might target the keyword, “Boca Raton Plumber”.

You’ll create an ad that has a title and description for your site. Here are the ads that currently display for “Boca Raton Plumber”:

Once you’ve created the ad, you have to bid for placement. Essentially, you’ll tell the search engine how much you want to pay in order to get someone to click the link to your site. This bid is called the cost per click.

The search engine will look at your proposed cost per click, as well as the perceived quality of the page you’re trying to display (its quality is determined by looking at a combination of click through rate and relevance to the searcher’s query).

It will then rank the potential paid search results and show them accordingly.

This form of advertising is best for those who need results fast. While many forms of Internet Marketing take a while to gain traction, PPC starts directing traffic to your site as soon as you have it set up.

That makes it great for promotional events, but it does come with some drawbacks. For one, it doesn’t scale very well. You’re always going to pay a set amount for every lead you get to a website. And it can quickly get expensive if you’re not careful.

The key is to watch your metrics closely. Determine how much you’re spending per visitor, the percentage of website visitors that convert into customers, and how much money you can make per customer.

If the amount you’re spending to get leads that turn into customers outweighs the amount you’re making with these customers, you’ll want to make changes to your campaign.

Most PPC marketers watch their metrics closely. They create landing pages designed to convert customers and constantly tweak their headlines, descriptions, and keywords to find the best results.

 

Social Media Marketing

Social Media Marketing is the broadest form of Internet Marketing we’ll talk about.

There are many different social media networks you can use — Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, etc. — and many different strategies you can employ to build your business.

If your business is something trendy like fashion or food, you’ll want to learn about Influencer Marketing and Instagram Marketing.

But for most businesses, there’s only one network you’ll want to focus on in the beginning: Facebook.

There are two simple things you can do with it.

For one, you’ll want to create a Facebook page. This gives your business credibility, allows you to share important information with customers, and helps them to connect with you.

Facebook explains how to create a business page here. One important thing to note is that you’re not creating a profile. Those are meant for people, and your customers are less likely to friend a business profile than they are to like a page.

The second thing you’ll be interested in are Facebook ads. Even this sliver of social media marketing can get complicated, so business owners new to Internet Marketing will want to start small with retargeting ads.

Essentially, you’ll set up your website with Facebook Pixel. This tells Facebook who’s been on your website. You then target these people with ads.

This is useful, because people who have already visited your site are more likely to become customers. They’re essentially ‘warm’ leads.

Targeting them with ads makes them more likely to buy from you. This method is particularly useful if you sell on your website. Even if you only sell through a physical location, though, these ads will help keep you in a potential customer’s mind.

Once you’ve gotten familiar with Facebook Ads, you might want to go deeper into its features. Facebook allows you to target very specific demographics, and the people who find the most success often tweak their demographics to determine their most likely audience.

 

Newsletter Marketing

Newsletter Marketing is all about taking warm leads and turning them into customers.

People come to your website and like what they see: maybe they’re interested in your product, maybe they see you as an authority in your field.

Whatever the reason, they’re interested in your business, but they’re not ready to spend any money.

The process, then, is simple. Probably the simplest of any marketing strategy we discuss in this post.

You collect their email, then send them occasional newsletters.

To get their email, simply let them know you have a newsletter. You can do this with a pop-up on your site or a Call to Action at the end of blog posts. Some businesses incentivize email signups by offering a downloadable PDF in exchange for an email address.

Once you have email addresses, you start sending out newsletters. Monthly newsletters are usually effective: they appear often enough to keep businesses in people’s minds, but not so often as to appear annoying.

That said, if you have enough to talk about, weekly newsletters are also common. For ecommerce stores running frequent deals, even daily frequency can be appropriate.

The real key is to make sure you’re providing value to subscribers. Give them actionable advice and offer good deals. Depending on your niche, personal stories can also provide value.

The presence and ratio of these things will vary depending on your business, but the point is simple: a newsletter allows leads and existing customers to form a deeper connection with you. This leads to trust, which then leads to sales.

 

SEO

Now we get to my field of specialization: Search Engine Optimization (SEO).

The goal is similar to PPC, but whereas PPC helps you rank in the ads section, SEO helps you rank in the normal, “organic” section of the search engine results page.

Here are the organic results that display when you type in “Boca Raton Plumber”:

As you can see with the Briggs Plumbing listing, businesses do rank on this page. However, search results feature a variety of pages, and so this one also features HomeAdvisor, Yelp, Angie’s List, and Better Business Bureau.

Different pages are going to have different sorts of results, depending both on how strongly various websites have optimized for search engines and which results Google thinks searchers would most like to see.

If we look at the other results ranking on the first page for this term, we can see some more results from businesses:

All of these results are similar to PPC ads, with their titles and descriptions. The major difference is that they lack the green “Ad” indicator.

One of the big advantages of SEO is that people are more likely to click on results that aren’t ads. With PPC, though, you have a bit more control over your positioning, because a main determining factor is how much you bid for ad placement.

With SEO, you’re not paying a search engine to help you rank well. Instead, you’re making sure your site is built in such a way that it appeals to searchers: creating content that thoroughly meets people’s needs when they’ve typed in a query like, “Boca Raton Plumber”.

You also make sure your site has links from high-quality sites pointed in its direction. Links are one of a search engine’s best ways of determining which sites are high-quality. And thus, which sites should rank well on a given search engine results page.

SEO is probably the most complex form of Internet Marketing we’re discussing in this article, but don’t worry. We’ll cover things in more detail in future columns.

For now, you simply need to know that SEO is a great way of getting new leads. It’s a bit like an investment. You put time — or money, if you’re hiring a Search Engine Optimizer — into building the content and links that help you rank well in Google.

These assets don’t then go away. Instead, good SEO work can help you rank well for high-performing keywords for years to come.

 

Internet Marketing in Boca Raton

That covers the basic aspects of Internet Marketing, but it’s impossible to give more than a basic overview in this amount of time.

If any of the forms of marketing above appeal to you, I’d recommend reaching out to an expert who can determine how these forms of marketing could help accelerate your business.

If you’re interested in SEO, we’ll feature plenty of information for you in the next couple months. Stay tuned!


About the Author

Billy Peery is an SEO expert working in Delray Beach. He’s written for Shopify, Cracked, Harvard Student Agencies, and a surprisingly large number of moving companies. Find out more about his Delray Beach SEO work here.

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/internet-marketing-explained/

Nov 30

Voting for the Web.com Small Business of the Tour Award Now UnderwayTwenty local business finalists vying for …

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Nov. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Web.com (Nasdaq:WEB), the umbrella sponsor of the Web.com Tour and a leading provider of a full range of Internet services and online marketing solutions for small businesses, today announced that voting has begun to select the winner of the inaugural Web.com Small Business of the Tour Award. Launched this past spring, the program honored one small business from each U.S. Web.com Tour tournament location for its community involvement and partnership with its local tournament. Now their community, and anyone else from around the world, has an opportunity to vote for their favorite business.

From now through December 6, people can visit smallbiztour.web.com to watch videos of the 20 small businesses that were recognized in each 2017 Web.com Tour location and cast their vote. Each video features the business owner’s “pitch,” which includes why they started their business, their community’s role in their business’ success and a challenge their business is facing that Web.com’s marketing people can help them solve. After casting a vote, voters can share who they selected on their personal social media channels.

The small business with the most votes will win $25,000 in Web.com online marketing products and services – which is about 10 times what the average small business owner spends on their annual media and marketing efforts, according to the advisory firm BIA/Kelsey’s Local Commerce Monitor.

“At Web.com we believe people in every profession have the potential to succeed, so long as they have the determination and are backed by the right tools and team,� says David L. Brown, chairman, chief executive officer and president, Web.com. “Just as the Web.com Tour helps golfers get to the next level, the people of Web.com provide the tools and counsel businesses need to reach their potential. We’re excited to share these amazing stories from small businesses across the country, and look forward to providing the winning business owner with the online marketing support they need to help build their brand, reach more customers and communicate better with the customers they have.�

People can visit smallbiztour.web.com and vote once per day for their favorite small business finalist. Voting concludes Wednesday, December 6 at 11:59 p.m. ET. The winner will be announced on Thursday, December 7 at the PGA Tour’s Annual Meeting in Boca Raton, Florida.

The 2017 Web.com Small Business of the Tournament finalists are:

  • Russ Alison Mercke, Express Printing, Broussard, Louisiana
  • Kyle Brinker, Brinker’s Jewelers, Newburg, Indiana
  • Jeff and Dorie Fann, Professional Party Rentals, Greenville, South Carolina
  • Ryan Woodard, Joseph C. Woodard Printing Company, Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Al Fattes, HankerPromo.com, Chicago
  • Bill Maness, Syndeo, Wichita, Kansas
  • Rick Serena, Frye-Williamson Press, Springfield, Illinois
  • Corey Kennedy, Kennedy Portable Toilets, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Jim Pullan Jr., Jamestown Mattress Co., Clymer, New York
  • Jon Rhodes, Rhodes Physical Therapy, Farmington, Utah
  • John Leiferman, Jill Davie Pasha Ostby, TEAM Software, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Jeff Auslander and Steve Flones, FloPath Automatic Logistics, Overland Park, Kansas
  • Nick Dillard and Dane Rogers, GDC Kitchen, Hayward, California
  • Bryan Magers, Bryan Properties, Springfield, Missouri
  • Kevin Lusby, IMAGE Construction of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee
  • Shanda Imlay and Kaye Carlson, FUNdaMental Golf and Learning Center, Portland, Oregon
  • Robb Dierken, Spacejunk, Columbus, Ohio
  • Jesse Hill, EventRent, Boise, Idaho
  • Jon Erisey, Power Media, Akron, Ohio
  • Don Nicol, TacoLu, Jacksonville Beach, Florida

About Web.com
Web.com Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:WEB) is a global provider of a full range of Internet services to small businesses to help them compete and succeed online. Web.com meets the needs of small businesses anywhere along their lifecycle with affordable, subscription-based solutions including domains, hosting, website design and management, search engine optimization, online marketing campaigns, local sales leads, social media, mobile products, eCommerce solutions and call center services. For more information, please visit www.web.com; follow the company on Twitter @webdotcom or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/web.com.

Contact:

Corporate Communications
(904) 680-6633
CorporateCommunications@web.com

Permanent link to this article: http://homebiz2bizreview.net/internet-marketing/voting-for-the-web-com-small-business-of-the-tour-award-now-underwaytwenty-local-business-finalists-vying-for/

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